.

Digital Reporting is ‘new genre’ of journalism in the 21st century

Erik Olsen, video journalist with The New York Times, speaks with Latin American journalists during a Digital Reporting workshop at the Institute of the Americas.

LA JOLLA, CAL.– As newspaper readership declines and viewers tune out nightly news broadcasts, people are increasingly turning to digital reports on news web sites for their information.
Video journalism is capturing the attention of audiences throughout the Americas.
“This is a new genre,” said Erik Olsen, video journalist for The New York Times. “To explain what’s going on in the world it’s important to have a visual element.”
Olsen met with journalists during a professional workshop organized by the Institute of the Americas entitled, “On the Cutting Edge: Digital Reporting in the 21st Century.”
Journalists from 10 countries in the Western Hemisphere attended the five-day workshop held on the Institute’s La Jolla campus. The workshop focused on video journalism, on building audio-visual slide shows and on analyzing new business models for delivering news via the internet.
The New York Times began placing news videos on its web site nine years ago.  Olsen, who worked as a producer at ABC News, was one of the first hired.
“The real joy and beauty of this opportunity is there is no format, so you can do what you want,” Olsen said. “You’re not constricted by the time limits of the networks. It doesn’t have to be exactly three minutes long. You have this incredible new flexibility.”
As the news industry moves to a new way of delivering news, Olsen said it is imperative that journalists learn new skills to meet the demand.
“At the Times, we’re training our print journalists to tell narrative stories with video. It’s not easy.  It takes a lot of practice and a lot of attention to detail,” he said. “But everybody is going to this digital format on the web so it benefits journalists to have a wide variety of skills. All news will eventually make in into the digital realm.”
With growing demand for digital reporting, the equipment and the technology are now less expensive that ever before, Olsen said. High-definition cameras cost less than $500 or less and are so small and lightweight that, “you can put them in your pocket.”
Olsen offered the journalists attending the Institute workshop a host of tips for reporting and preparing video news reports: Find the beautiful details that tell the story, wait for the right moment, help the moment happen.  Find someone who is charismatic, whose journey takes you into the bigger picture.
Robert Hernandez, professor of professional practice at the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism, offered his own set of tips during a media boot camp he prepared for the journalists at Los Angeles Pierce College.
Hernandez, who worked for seven years as the director of development at the Seattle Times and as a web consultant for La Prensa Grafica, a leading newspaper in El Salvador, taught the journalists how to build an audio-visual slide show.
He told the journalists that audio-visual slide shows are “the cheapest, easiest way to deliver a news presentation.”
Hernandez said that reporters have just seven seconds to capture the attention of the audience, so “every image, every sound must have a purpose.” He added that an audio slide show is more effective when it is paired with a news story.
The journalists also heard from the editors of two San Diego on-line news sites which are viewed as models for upstart web publications across the country.
Andrew Donohue, editor of Voice of San Diego.org, said the focus of his news organization is public service.  Voice of San Diego, founded four years ago is funded by private donors.
Voice of San Diego, which has garnered national awards for its investigative reports, emphasizes deep, analytical stories rather than breaking news, Donohue said. “If SDNN.com or The San Diego Union-Tribune does a good story, we don’t spend our time rewriting it. And we try to leave multimedia to those who do it best.  Really, we are writers.”
Chris Jennewein, president of San Diego News Network, or SDNN.com., launched his on-line news site a year ago in San Diego.  Jennewein’s new organization is a for-profit operation which strives to stand out in an increasingly crowded on-line market.
 “There is a lot of discussion that on-line news can’t be paid for. I don’t believe that,” Jennewein said. “Years from now we will all look back at this time and shake our heads.  I think this is a model that will increasingly work around the world.”
The journalists took a field trip to the offices of SDNN.com, where they met with 30-year-old Managing Editor Eric Yates.
Yates, who describes himself as a “child of the internet,” said he has “a passion for the news and for writing and for being in this emerging technology. It’s exciting and scary at the same time.”
He said readers are still looking for compelling stories based on accurate, analytical reporting.
 “I think newspapers will still be relevant 10 years from now, but they’re going to have to be packaged in a different way,” Yates said.  “They can’t be full of information that people can find somewhere else with the click of a mouse.”


Erik Olsen, video periodista del The New York Times, con Pedro Natividad, de Nuevo Laredo, México

LA JOLLA, CAL.- Al disminuir la lectura de periódicos y sintonización de televidentes en la transmisión de noticieros nocturnos, la gente está cada vez más a los informes digitales en los sitios web de noticias para su información.
Video periodismo está capturando la atención del público en las Américas.
 "Este es un nuevo género", dijo Erik Olsen, video-periodista de The New York Times. “To explain what's going on in the world it's important to have a visual element.” "Para explicar lo que está pasando en el mundo es importante contar con un elemento visual."
 Olsen se reunió con los periodistas durante un seminario profesional organizado por el Instituto de las Américas sobre el tema, "Sobre la posición de vanguardia: Digital de Información en el siglo 21."
 Los periodistas de 10 países en el Hemisferio Occidental asistieron al taller de cinco días de duración celebrado en el Instituto La Jolla de campus. The workshop focused on video journalism, on building audio-visual slide shows and on analyzing new business models for delivering news via the internet. El taller se centró en el periodismo de vídeo, en la creación de presentaciones de diapositivas audio-visual y en el análisis de nuevos modelos de negocio para la entrega de noticias a través de Internet.
 El New York Times comenzó a colocar videos de noticias en su sitio web hace nueve años. Olsen, quien trabajó como productor de ABC News, fue uno de los primeros contratados.
 "La verdadera alegría y la belleza de esta oportunidad es que no hay formato, así que usted puede hacer lo que quiera", dijo Olsen. “You're not constricted by the time limits of the networks. "Usted no está constreñida por los límites de tiempo de las redes. It doesn't have to be exactly three minutes long. No tiene por qué ser exactamente tres minutos de duración. You have this incredible new flexibility.” Usted tiene la nueva flexibilidad increíble. "
 A medida que la industria de las noticias a una nueva forma de entregar noticias, Olsen dijo que es imperativo que los periodistas aprender nuevas habilidades para satisfacer la demanda.
 "En el Times, estamos formando a nuestros periodistas de prensa escrita para contar historias narrativas con el vídeo. It's not easy.  It takes a lot of practice and a lot of attention to detail,” he said. No es fácil. Se requiere mucha práctica y mucha atención al detalle ", dijo. “But everybody is going to this digital format on the web so it benefits journalists to have a wide variety of skills. "Pero todo el mundo va a este formato digital en la web por lo que los beneficios a los periodistas a tener una gran variedad de habilidades. All news will eventually make in into the digital realm.” Todas las noticias en el futuro haga en el reino digital ".
Con la creciente demanda de información digital, los equipos y la tecnología son más baratos que nunca, dijo Olsen. High-definition cameras cost less than $500 or less and are so small and lightweight that, “you can put them in your pocket.” cámaras de alta definición cuestan menos de $ 500 o menos y son tan pequeños y ligeros que, "puedes poner en tu bolsillo."
 Olsen ofrece a los periodistas que asistieron al taller Instituto una serie de consejos para la presentación de informes y la preparación de los informes de noticias en video: Encuentra los hermosos detalles que cuentan la historia, espere el momento justo, ayudar al momento de suceder. Busque a alguien que es carismático, cuyo viaje le lleva en el cuadro más grande.
Robert Hernández, profesor de práctica profesional en la Escuela de USC Annenberg de Comunicación y Periodismo, ofreció su propia serie de consejos en un campo de entrenamiento los medios de comunicación se preparó para los periodistas en Los Angeles Pierce College.
Hernández, quien trabajó durante siete años como director de desarrollo en el Seattle Times y como consultor web para La Prensa Gráfica, un periódico líder en El Salvador, enseñó a los periodistas cómo crear una presentación de diapositivas audio-visual.
Le dijo a los periodistas que los pases de diapositivas audiovisual son "los más baratos, manera más fácil para hacer una presentación de prensa."
Hernández dijo que los reporteros tienen sólo siete segundos para captar la atención de la audiencia, por lo que "cada imagen, cada sonido debe tener un propósito." Añadió que una presentación de diapositivas de audio es más eficaz cuando se combina con una historia de noticias.
Los periodistas también escuchó a los editores de dos de San Diego sitios de noticias online que son vistos como modelos para publicaciones web advenedizo en todo el país.
Andrew Donohue, director de La Voz de San Diego.org, dijo que el foco de su organización de noticias es el servicio público. Voz de San Diego, fundada hace cuatro años es un proyecto financiado por donantes privados.
Voz de San Diego, que ha ganado premios nacionales por sus reportajes de investigación, hace hincapié en profundidad, historias de análisis en lugar de noticias de última hora, dijo Donohue. “If SDNN.com or The San Diego Union-Tribune does a good story, we don't spend our time rewriting it. "Si SDNN.com o The San Diego Union Tribune-tiene una buena historia, no gastamos nuestro tiempo reescribirlo. And we try to leave multimedia to those who do it best.  Really, we are writers.” Y tratamos de salir de multimedia a los que lo hacen mejor. En realidad, somos escritores ".
Chris Jennewein, presidente de San Diego News Network, o SDNN.com., lanzó su sitio de noticias en línea hace un año en San Diego. Jennewein es una operación con fines de lucro que se esfuerza por sobresalir en un abarrotado cada vez más de- línea de mercado.
"Hay mucha discusión que las noticias en línea no puede ser pagado. I don't believe that,” Jennewein said. Yo no creo eso ", dijo Jennewein. “Years from now we will all look back at this time and shake our heads.  I think this is a model that will increasingly work around the world.” "Dentro de unos años todos vamos a mirar hacia atrás en este momento y sacudir la cabeza. Creo que este es un modelo que cada vez más el trabajo de todo el mundo."
Los periodistas hicieron un viaje de campo a las oficinas de SDNN.com, donde se reunieron con el jefe de redacción, Eric Yates, de tan solo 30 años de edad.
Yates, quien se describe como un "niño de la Internet", dijo que tiene "una pasión por la noticia y por escribir y por estar en esta tecnología emergente. It's exciting and scary at the same time.” Es emocionante y aterrador al mismo tiempo. "
Él dijo que los lectores todavía están buscando historias atractivas basadas en información precisa y analítica.
"Creo que los periódicos seguirán siendo relevantes dentro de 10 años, pero van a tener que ser empaquetado de una manera diferente", dijo Yates. "No pueden estar llenos de información que la gente pueda encontrar en otro lugar con un clic de un ratón.

Se autoriza la publicación de la información siempre y cuando se cite la fuente (www.hoylaredo.net)